Be Thou my Vision

The decorations are down, the bare Christmas trees have been sent to the tip, and there are no more flashing fairy lights outside houses to brighten up my early morning walks. It’s mid-January, it’s already the third week back at work, and it’s not always easy in these dark days to find motivation and meaning. And it’s no wonder that many people take now to booking their summer holidays, with the lure of long sunny days ‘away from it all’. Continue Reading

Irish Chaplaincy is Hiring – Resettlement Caseworker

Come and be part of an exciting new project, assisting Travellers in selected London prisons into post-release employment

 

Salary: £26,360

 

This is a 3 year fixed-term contract, with continuation dependent on further funding.

 

NB The successful candidate will not be able to begin in post until prison-vetting has taken place.

If you have any questions regarding this job application, please contact Eddie Gilmore on 0207 482 5528 or eddie.gilmore@irishchaplaincy.org.uk

Deadline for applications: January 30th 2019

 

Interviews:  February 19th 2019

 

Download documents:

JD Resettlement Caseworker

IC Resettlement Caseworker Application Form

IC Equal opportunities monitoring

Journey into Advent

Journey into Advent with Irish Chaplaincy

Fri 30th Nov 6:00pm – 7:00pm
Our Lady, Help of Christians Catholic Church4 Lady Margaret Rd, London NW5 2XT, UK map 
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Journey into Advent – a time of Taizé music, reflections and silence in preparation for the great season of Advent.

Friday 30th November 2018 6-6:45 pm

Our Lady Help of Christians, 4 Lady Margaret Rd, Kentish Town NW5 2XT

www.irishchaplaincy.org.uk
Tel: 020 7482 5528 Email: admin@irishchaplaincy.org.uk

Remembrance-Two Grandfathers And World War One

As a native of Liverpool, with Wexford roots from my maternal grandfather, I grew up with stories of the family farm back in Ferns, and stories of my grandfather, Henry Gahan, a Liverpool man, who was a veteran of the trenches of World War One.

As a member of the Royal Engineers, he would crawl out into no man’s land-that very dangerous space between the British and German trenches-to try and intercept German messages on their telephone lines. However, at the end of 1916, as a result of the wet conditions of the trenches, he became ill and was discharged from the army and returned to his job as a post office telegrapher in Liverpool.

A hundred years ago on 11 November 1918, he was on duty in Liverpool’s main post office, in his role as a telegraphist. He was responsible for receiving and sending messages via morse code-a series of dots and dashes-along radio lines, one of the main methods of electronic communications a century ago.

Continue Reading